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What are the black diamonds on a tape measure?

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QuestionI'm pretty new to DIY and am slowly filling a toolbox with some basic tools for small home repairs. I recently was looking at my tape measure when I realized I have never really looked carefully at the blade. I'm somewhat confused by all the markings on the blade and would like to know why there are small black diamonds on my tape measure.

AnswerThe small black diamonds, or triangles (diamonds are more commonly found), on the top scale of the tape measure starting at 19.2 inches are for truss layouts for 8-foot sheet goods. They are also known as the "black truss" markings. They provide a quick visual for the tape user and speed up the measuring process.

black diamonds on tape measure, triangles on tape measure, truss layouts, 8-foot sheet goods, metric layouts, five trusses per sheet, red stud markings, EasyPoint ProTape, Learn How to Read and Choose a Tape Measure, copyright by Leon A. Frechette/C.R.S., Inc.Originally, 19.2 inches was used in metric layouts. Dividing 5 into 96 inches (8 feet) gives 19.2 inches, which yields five trusses per sheet. The black arrow in the photo to the right points directly at the black diamond located on 19.2".

The "red stud" markings every 16 inches allow for a standard layout of six studs per 8-foot (96") section. You will find 5 black diamonds or 6 red stud markings in an 8-foot width.

Truss Example: Look carefully at your tape and count the black diamonds. You'll notice that the fifth one lands on 8 feet. Since an 8-foot sheet spans half the distance of its size, the second course would start at the halfway point (4 feet) or, in this case, at the third diamond, which is slightly over 3' 2 3/8".

The 19.2" black truss marking is a better span if you don't want to span 24 inches on center with today's undersized plywood. However, I prefer 16 inches on center for a truss layout, especially if 1/2" wallboard will be attached to the bottom chord of trusses. Even with a 19.2" layout, I would recommend using 5/8" or 3/4" plywood and 5/8" wallboard.




Purchase this article to learn how to read and choose a tape measure!

Understanding the meaning of the diamonds or triangles on a tape measure is just one facet of using this complex tool.

To really learn the ins and outs of reading a tape measure and to gain insights into choosing the best one for you, consider purchasing my award-winning article, "Learn How to Read and Choose a Tape Measure." This article received the 2008 Vaughan/National Association of Home and Workshop Writers (NAHWW) Golden Hammer Writing Award in the Internet Category. 

Available in both .pdf and hard copy, this 8-page article features 21 color photographs and provides outstanding information about using a tape measure to its full potential and purchasing a quality tape measure.

Click here to read customers' feedback. To purchase "Learn How to Read and Choose a Tape Measure," click here!


Purchase the EasyPoint ProTape!

Now that you have some insight into what the black diamonds are used for, I encourage you to take a look at a pro tape for your toolbox. We've been offering the easy-to-read EasyPoint ProTape with our own private label for years.

Assembled in the U.S., the EasyPoint ProTape has ergonomic rubber grips built into the case for a comfortable and secure grip. This tape measure has a 25-foot-long 1-inch blade, weighs just under 16 ounces, and features an easy-to-use thumb blade lock. Its large numbers don't require glasses to read and its lower scale is in 1/16-inch increments with printed fractions that start at 1/8 inch. An active bumper built into the case helps to prevent the tip from snapping off as it absorbs the shock from the tip after the blade

here to read customers' feedback. To purchase the EasyPoint ProTape, a fractional-read type measure by U.S. Tape, click here!

Copyright © 2008 LAF/C.R.S., Inc. All rights reserved.
Question answered by Leon A. Frechette.



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